Stella Dimoko Korkus.com: HajibGATE -Affected Law Grad Amasa Firdaus Says There Is No LAW Preventing The Wearing Of Hajib During Call To Bar...

Advertisement

Advertisement - Mobile In-Article

Saturday, 16 December 2017

HajibGATE -Affected Law Grad Amasa Firdaus Says There Is No LAW Preventing The Wearing Of Hajib During Call To Bar...

The Nigerian Law School graduate denied access to the venue of the call to the bar ceremony earlier this week says her demand remains the need to grant approval for the use of hijab among Muslim law graduates.






Firdaus Amasa, a graduate of the University of Ilorin, had been denied access to the ceremony after insisting on wearing hijab during the ceremony.

Ms. Amasa was specifically refused entry into the hall for insisting to wear the wig on top of her hijab – a headscarf.

The case has attracted significant attention on social media, with Nigerians divided on her decision and that of the authorities of the law school.

Speaking with PREMIUM TIMES on Saturday, Ms. Amasa maintained that she remained resolute in her convictions to set a precedent for Hijab-wearing Muslims during the ceremony.

“My major concern is the approval of Hijab so that every person coming behind me will be able to use it for the call to bar (ceremony),” she told PREMIUM TIMES.

When asked whether she was aware of rules and regulations that guide against the use of Hijab at the ceremony, she said there was none, stressing that it was merely based on conventions.

“There is nothing like that (laws preventing the use of Hijab) “When you ask them too, they tell you it is convention; that that is how it is done and it has to remain like that.”

Asked what motivated her to take the decision, she explained that she wanted to change the narrative and give Muslim sisters the rights to express their constitutional rights as enshrined in the constitution.

“I knew that was what was going to happen,” she said of the consequences of her decision. She, however, said she remained resolute in her convictions to speak for the recognition of rights of female Muslim law graduates.

She explained further that the Law School has not said anything on the case, adding that the support from the Muslim community has been impressive.

“My demand is that Hijab should be approved,” she affirmed.


*If there is no Law referring to this in the handbook of the Nigerian Law School,she should be called to Bar ASAP.......

64 comments:

Greatlady. said...

Hehe...lets see what follow.
Law bvs, come and educate us more

Alloy Chikezie said...

In the legal practice, popularity and media attention is needed to take your career to the next level, and she has already gotten plenty of that even before she was called to bar, that means her career has a legal practitioner has already started and already in the next level before she was called to bar.
Congratulobia to her.

Your comment will be visible after approval

EESAH (Mr Nobody) said...

You go girl! We need more of such people in Nigeria. People who know their rights and ain't afraid to demand for it. People who don't follow the crowd and dare to be different. Let the Islamophobic comments continue

Olori Orente said...

She is even an alumni of my school
If there is no law backing the 'no wearing hijab' brouhaha,then it's injustice.

OLA MIKE said...

okay oh

Dreamcatcher said...

This one is not ready to be called to bar mtchewww

Otaswifey chat me up for your classy traditional marriage aso - oke at the most affordable rate said...

This hijab thing has been an issue, first it was secondary school students now lawyers.

Anonymous said...

I only pity this lady, you want to remove the head of a masquerade. Well *spreads mat holding popcorn*

The Truth said...

On the issue of hijab at Call to Bar

Nigeria cannot be a nation without having a national identity and national values for which everyone, irrespective of ethnic, religious, regional or political leaning, are bound.

Section 38 of the Constitution of the Federal Republic of Nigeria (1999) as amended guarantees the fundamental right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion.

The case of the female aspirant to the Bar who flouted the age-long rule of the legal profession in Nigeria by wearing hijab to the last Call to Bar ceremony and was denied entry following her refusal to remove the hijab has further brought the issue of religion to the fore.

People are entitled to their views. But let us get certain facts clear.

One, there is no compulsion in joining the noble, legal profession. If we say that the Body of Benchers was wrong to have refused this lady access into the auditorium for the Call to Bar, we are simply saying that the Rule should have been bended to accommodate her interpretation of fidelity to Islam.

No one forced her to read law. No one forced her to go to the Law School. No one forced her to become a lawyer. She elected on her own volition to be part of the profession having known the strict rules, including the dress code for the Call to Bar ceremony. Let it not be said that she was ignorant of what she was not expected to wear.

Two, religion should be personal. To that extent, people should realise that in a multi-religious and supposedly secular society like ours, individual religious beliefs have to be sacrificed in certain circumstances for the overall benefit of all. In this context, there can be no distinction between Christianity, Islam, Traditional Worship and other religions. None is superior to the other.

If we hold the wearing of hijab to Call to Bar as a fundamental right and the denial of same as an infringement, it means that members of the Brotherhood of the Cross and Star, Celestial, Osu worshippers, Rosicrusians, Elkanka, Catholics and other faiths also have the right to wear their peculiar apparel for the Call to Bar. This is the natural and only plausible implication.

The fundamental right to religion contemplated by the Constitution does not inure to benefit of only Muslims or Christians. Islam is not mentioned in Section 38 of the Constitution neither is Christianity. The Constitution contemplates ALL beliefs. The argument that Muslim women are commanded by the Koran to wear hijab unlike the apparel of other faiths is only tenable within the Islamic Jurisprudence and application strictly in the Mosque or other places where secular or national laws do not prescribe otherwise. There is a difference between Islamic Jurisprudence and Nigerian Jurisprudence. Section 10 of the Constitution makes Nigeria a secular state.

The point is that if everyone insist that they should be allowed to wear their respective religious apparel for the Call to Bar ceremony, anarchy will be the inevitable result. That is part of the reason why there is a standard Dress Code for ALL. If you feel that you cannot abide by it, you can join another profession.

Three, Thousands of Muslim women have been called to the Nigerian Bar over the years without any controversy. I refuse to accept that the lady in question is the most devout Muslim in her set.

Four, religious extremism has never done any society any good. People who insist that the rest of the society must concede to the way they choose to practice their religion at all times and places are extremists. No Muslim woman was born with a hijab. No Catholic was born with a crucifix. I do not know whether both apparel can be worn at ALL times, including when having bath, sleeping and so on. The point is that these things are not and can only be sacrosanct depending on the circumstance, environment and other considerations.

The Truth said...

On the issue of hijab at Call to Bar

Nigeria cannot be a nation without having a national identity and national values for which everyone, irrespective of ethnic, religious, regional or political leaning, are bound.

Section 38 of the Constitution of the Federal Republic of Nigeria (1999) as amended guarantees the fundamental right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion.

The case of the female aspirant to the Bar who flouted the age-long rule of the legal profession in Nigeria by wearing hijab to the last Call to Bar ceremony and was denied entry following her refusal to remove the hijab has further brought the issue of religion to the fore.

People are entitled to their views. But let us get certain facts clear.

One, there is no compulsion in joining the noble, legal profession. If we say that the Body of Benchers was wrong to have refused this lady access into the auditorium for the Call to Bar, we are simply saying that the Rule should have been bended to accommodate her interpretation of fidelity to Islam.

No one forced her to read law. No one forced her to go to the Law School. No one forced her to become a lawyer. She elected on her own volition to be part of the profession having known the strict rules, including the dress code for the Call to Bar ceremony. Let it not be said that she was ignorant of what she was not expected to wear.

Two, religion should be personal. To that extent, people should realise that in a multi-religious and supposedly secular society like ours, individual religious beliefs have to be sacrificed in certain circumstances for the overall benefit of all. In this context, there can be no distinction between Christianity, Islam, Traditional Worship and other religions. None is superior to the other.

If we hold the wearing of hijab to Call to Bar as a fundamental right and the denial of same as an infringement, it means that members of the Brotherhood of the Cross and Star, Celestial, Osu worshippers, Rosicrusians, Elkanka, Catholics and other faiths also have the right to wear their peculiar apparel for the Call to Bar. This is the natural and only plausible implication.

The fundamental right to religion contemplated by the Constitution does not inure to benefit of only Muslims or Christians. Islam is not mentioned in Section 38 of the Constitution neither is Christianity. The Constitution contemplates ALL beliefs. The argument that Muslim women are commanded by the Koran to wear hijab unlike the apparel of other faiths is only tenable within the Islamic Jurisprudence and application strictly in the Mosque or other places where secular or national laws do not prescribe otherwise. There is a difference between Islamic Jurisprudence and Nigerian Jurisprudence. Section 10 of the Constitution makes Nigeria a secular state.

The point is that if everyone insist that they should be allowed to wear their respective religious apparel for the Call to Bar ceremony, anarchy will be the inevitable result. That is part of the reason why there is a standard Dress Code for ALL. If you feel that you cannot abide by it, you can join another profession.

Three, Thousands of Muslim women have been called to the Nigerian Bar over the years without any controversy. When I was at the Law School, we were constantly reminded of the strict dress code for the Call to Bar ceremony. I recall that I had to buy a new black (not just dark) suits, I refuse to accept that the lady in question is the most devout Muslim in her set.

Four, religious extremism has never done any society any good. People who insist that the rest of the society must concede to the way they choose to practice their religion at all times and places are extremists. No Muslim woman was born with a hijab. No Catholic was born with a crucifix. I do not know whether both apparel can be worn at ALL times, including when having bath, sleeping and so on. The point is that these things are not and can only be sacrosanct depending on the circumstance, environment and other considerations.

Anonymous said...

Silly girl. She finished law school the same time as her younger sister yet the younger sister now has seniority at the bar over. Congratulations you have succeeded in being controversial. I hope you get what you want if not, your parents have wasted money. Anyway a career exists in Muslim rights for you.

Adadioramma said...

Drama Queen

Anonymous said...

Ohk. ...so she was actually trying to prove a point then...wonderful!and on the long run , they tend to be the worst behaved! We have them plenty when I was in Uni.

Anonymous said...

There rules for call to bar dress code, this Muslims should just go and rest, your full face and ear must show during call to bar, be on only natural hair, stud earrings, let me rest mbuk I tire for this people,sisters will start wearing their own to call to bar I'd that the case, was she the only Muslim? Even buhari daughter dressed according to the rules that day, they should just stop giving her attention, nonsense

Anonymous said...

She refused to remove hijab to take oath and be called to bar

Same girl will remove it wen she wants to suck preeq

Same girl studied NIGERIAN LAW for good 6years and ended up Disobeying same LAW she supposedly studied

This isn't discrimination, it's a clear case of NO SENSE

Anonymous said...

Your girl refused to remove hijab to take oath and be called to bar

Same girl will remove it wen she wants to suck preeq

Same girl studied NIGERIAN LAW for good 6years and ended up Disobeying same LAW she supposedly studied

This isn't discrimination, it's a clear case of NO SENSE

Olivia Silk said...

I said it. That she knew what she was doing.
Lol.

Lawyer Ikpeama.
🀣🀣🀣🀣

gagaga said...

πŸ‘πŸ‘πŸ‘

PL THE GREAT said...

The truth, this is simply the truth! I had to scroll up to get your name. Your comment should be printed and placed on the door posts of people like eesah and his cohorts.

Good writeup.

Anonymous said...

@The Truth..... fantastic analysis of the whole drama. Thanks for saving me the time and energy. The lady in question has clearly demonstrated that she has no respect for rules,laws and institutions despite the fact that she is suppose to be a lagal professional. She wants attention and she has it now....But moving forward I see she just finished her career as a lawyer before it took off.

Love.Eating.Pussy said...

The Truth you just explained this nonsense trend she wants to start well.

Imagine the chaos that would happen if every person been called to the Bar decides to dress according to their religious belief not minding the fact that they would be defending and interpreting the countries constitution and not the doctrines of their individual religious institution forgetting the fact that Nigeria is a secular state governed by rules and regulations and not religious doctrines.

she doesn't deserve to be called to the bar as she has shown that she will always put her religious beliefs forward as against practicing within the Nigerian constitution.


LEPπŸ˜›

Iphie dearie said...

Heheheh.
Like I knew where she was headedπŸ™ŒπŸ™ŒπŸ™Œ She knew exactly what she was doing.
Movements and causes started just like this...
You believe in something, stand by it and make them hear you.
Just like I typed earlier, Nigerian constitutions especially adopted ones must begin to get infused by our religious and cultural diversity.
So this must include different Religious dress codes too.

Ollie, I told ya she might just get a hand shake and platform. Lol

St.FranKooL.... said...

This fire she has just started might escalate into a widespread conflict, knowing how sensitive Nigeria is. This point she's trying to prove is not necessary but divisive...

Coconut head lawyer...

EESAH (Mr Nobody) said...

Oga or madam, not in this Nigeria when over 60% of its population are Muslims. Muslims will always wear hijab to school and the one for call to bar has just started. Yall better get used to it. We can't sacrifice an integral part of our religion for call to bar and we also won't stop studying law, get it? You better find a way of putting it in there if it isn't. If you can sacrifice yours easily, not all Muslims can. Capish? No be una Islamophobic selves only get mouth

Affordable accessories said...

There is no such rule preventing people from wearing hijab to call to bar. If there is any previously written,let them show us where it is written. Law students in Abuja wore their hijab tucked in to their call to bar just like Firdaus did and they were allowed to enter. Firdaus was denied because She was in Lagos. That is double standards and great injustice. The people in charge must be brought to the books and they must pay damages. We won't stop till we get justice for Firdaus

Anonymous said...

I am Fayose Aregbesola. I worship orunmila and other deities. At my call to the bar, I am going to dress in my "fadeyi" regalia and put my wig and gown. It is freedom of religion. It is freedom of expression.
I am an Adventist. The MCQ on Saturday in the Nigerian Law School must be cancelled. It is against the tenet of my religion.
I am a Rev'd Sister. My headscarf is my religious attachment to my God. I cannot remove it even for the Call to the Bar Ceremony. Freedom of religion! Freedom of expression!
I am a Deeperlifer with a peculiar way of covering my head. It is a religious affiliation. I must put my wig on the Deeperlife-type of headscarf during the Call to the Bar ceremony.
I worship Sango, the god whose worshippers emit fire. I must emit that fire to appreciate my god during the Call to the Bar Ceremony.
It is not about Muslims. It is about sanity in the land. We are all being discriminated against after all.

Anonymous said...

If she can prove to me she is a virgin, I will support her till death. There is no one righteous not even one, claiming to be what I can't explain. Are you that religious or you be Aminat wey born una prophet, abeg go and find several seat and gum your bum bum. Anofia

Anonymous said...

please we require wisdom contribution here for it's a serious issue. She has her right to wear hijab since it was not stated in the constitution guiding her profession.
We shall all parted this sinful world one and be accountable for our deeds.

Anonymous said...

Don't forget she's not licensed to practice law until she gets called to bar. So what career are we talking about. She should have gotten called first before fighting law school or body of benchers. I can get it with you that if she's not careful she won't be called. They will just say she's not fit and proper

ThatYorubaChic#wifenotcook said...

'And I must emit fire' kukuma kee me LMAO

Anonymous said...

You are a liar

Anonymous said...

Stella see your mouth like she must be called to bar asap. As if that's how they call people to bar. Sometimes you will just be typing like one illiterate

Anonymous said...

Shut up and listen to elders! Over 60% of its population are Muslims where? Nigeria Na ya papa palour? Go and “put it in there” na, since Allah Na una family name! Imbe!! Religion kill you der!!!

Anonymous said...

What are you on about? There's only one place call to bar holds and it's in Abuja. What they wear during law school is different from the call, and note that during the compulsory 3 diners held during law school no one is allowed to have anything but natural hair on their head.

Greatlady. said...

@The truth, you deserve the tightest and warmest hug right now. 😘😘😘. Thank you

This your comment deserve to be a stand alone post and should be circulated round social media.

And this is exactly what the President could not explain.

Stella, it would really be nice if you make this comment a stand alone post so Nigerians will understand better.

@Eesah, calm down and learn. You are really allowing uself be a block head because of Hijab

Anonymous said...

No one intends to stop you elenu. Last last Na Bros Boko matter! Remind me again, no be north them dey? And no be Muslim dem sef be? Shior!!!

Anonymous said...

She is not the first Muslim woman to read law or be called to the Nigerian Bar.

Even women from Zamfara state have been called to Bar.
None of them wore or insisted on wearing a hijab.

Abeg make we hear word for this one. She wants to be her claim to fame, to enter the Nigerian history books. OK naa...

Sassy Meruche said...

Eesah,argue with wisdom.The law is no respecter of RELIGION.Every profession has rules guiding it.YOU DON'T WEAR ANYTHING OB YOUR HEAD FOR CALL.NO WEAVES, ATTACHMENTS... NOTHING! YOU GO WITH YOUR NATURAL HAIR.Tge Secretary of the Body of benchers is female,yet she removed her hijab.Who the hell is she? During NYSC orientation camp,the Christians who normally would not wear trousers are made to wear it.It's against their beliefs but they were it regardless.So argue wisely oga.

Sassy Meruche said...

The Constitution trumps any Religious beliefs.Tge rules can't be bent because of her.She was not the only Muslim there.This is a lost cause.It's not about fighting for her right.It's about obeying rules guiding a profession.

Greatlady. said...

Iphie, me I don't think so. her fight is aimless judging by what @The truth type up there. If I am to say, she just ended her career before she even started.


I wanna ask, is there still an opportunity for her since she missed this one?

Greatlady. said...

Last paragraph @lol

Sassy Meruche said...

SMH.When a layman talks,it's so obvious.Please,argue with facts.

First of all,NO ONE IS CALLED TO BAR IN ANY OTHER PLACE BUT ICC (INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE CENTER) ABUJA.That's where everyone is called.There are different law schools but EVERYONE goes to Abuja to be called to bar.

Secondly,NO ONE IS ALLOWED to cover their hair for the call.Not even weaves or attachments are allowed.You MUST be on your natural hair.Make inquiries first before you write what you don't know.

Greatlady. said...

πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚

πŸ‘πŸ‘πŸ‘πŸ‘..Valid point

O J said...

@ affordable assessories- Why are u lying? The call to bar ceremony was only held in Abuja for all new wigs.
I was there. Hijab was not allowed.
You can't even braid hair,fix a weavon neither can u wear a wig on "the wig".
Fear God and stop "assessorizing" ur lie!

Iphie dearie said...

Sassy&GreatLady.. I’m trying to say that if such a thing would ever happen, It must not be for Islamic students alone, everyone MUST be allowed to excercise their freedom to express themselves culturally and religiously.. lets see where that leads.😁
I give her E for Effort though. She has guts.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous 15:22 copy copy kee u dere

Anonymous said...

Big liar. When did law school start holding call to bar ceremony in Lagos and Abuja?

Anonymous said...

Shut up pls

Anonymous said...

Dis girl is just allowing d devil to use her and destroy her destiny!smh

QUEEN AMY Loves ACCESS BANK said...

Truth you have said nothing but the truth.

Tuesday's Child said...

@anonymous 16:58 exactly! They will refuse her on the ground that she is not fit and proper.

I wish she started this 'fight' after being called. I read somewhere that her younger sister who is claiming she's in support of her big sis was called to bar on the same day big refused to remove her hijab. I just don't get it.

Every law student at law school knows that there is a strong dress code for call to bar. If you can't abide by it then go study another course. You must loosen your hair sef as no weaves and braids are allowed.

BTW I've never seen a police woman or female immigration Officer wear hijab. Is it that there are no female Muslims in the police or uniformed offices? Someone who knows should pls help answer o.

Tuesday's Child said...

@the Truth. Very well said! Thanks

Anonymous said...

Islamophobic? yinmu

Ralu M said...

This her case is dead on arrival. Essah, receive sense sho gbo? This country belongs to everybody so don't think that the constitution and laid down rules will be bent and twisted to make Muslims happy in this country. Tell your holy Sister to look for another cause to fight and whilst you are at it, read what Truth wrote again since it's obvious that understanding was far from you the first time you read it ...see her shouting up and down as if she wears it to bathe, sleep and when having sex 😀 lawyer ikpeama

AbaMade said...

Why choose a profession that will be in constant conflict with your faith, because in law, hijab or no hijab will be the least of her problems, a profession based more on facts and evidences than on morals how is she going to cope?
I hope some people didn't put her up to this though, to spark a debate

No sentiments said...

This eesah dude is just making me laugh. Bros, you can't eat your cake and have it. We want you to practice your religion happily that was why we asked for the country to be separated into arewa, oduduwa,and biafra repubic.you people were chanting one Nigeria. Oya restructure the country, so states can be empowered you people refused. Now you want to impose your religion on others. Please take plenty seats, because you have not even started. Since Nigeria is one, and she wants to practice Nigerian law, then she MUST dress like a Nigerian lawyer or better still fight for restructuring(decentralization) and be called at the Arewa bar or zamfara bar.

Sharon said...

Well said!!

Anonymous said...

Well said

Olivia Silk said...

I have been trying to comment.
I hope this goes through.

Iphie she won't be getting any handshake. Not even from a local govt chairman.

Is she treated unfairly by being denied a call? The answer is No. For a year, she was taught and made aware of the regulations of this particular body. She is not taken unawares. From the day they step their feet into the law school, these rules are repeated over and over. While she has a case, I insist that her day of call is a wrong day to choose this particular fight. There are procedures and processes to advocacy and agitation.

Like many things, religion is something we inherit and it is artificial. Should we insist upon our rights at all times without the consideration of the rights of others? What happens if we all insist on our personal rules and expressions at all times?

To be a lawyer is not a right. To be affiliated with the Nigerian Law School is a privilege strictly, not a right. I see no injustice here. This is not a religious war. The hijab is not under attack. Let's not fan embers of an unnecessary war. We have a handful of nuns and people from various religious groups who are also subjected to this exception and not just our Muslim sisters.

I still say she is a stupid human being.

Olivia Silk said...

I have been trying to comment.
I hope this goes through.

Iphie she won't be getting any handshake. Not even from a local govt chairman.

Is she treated unfairly by being denied a call? The answer is No. For a year, she was taught and made aware of the regulations of this particular body. She is not taken unawares. From the day they step their feet into the law school, these rules are repeated over and over. While she has a case, I insist that her day of call is a wrong day to choose this particular fight. There are procedures and processes to advocacy and agitation.

Like many things, religion is something we inherit and it is artificial. Should we insist upon our rights at all times without the consideration of the rights of others? What happens if we all insist on our personal rules and expressions at all times?

To be a lawyer is not a right. To be affiliated with the Nigerian Law School is a privilege strictly, not a right. I see no injustice here. This is not a religious war. The hijab is not under attack. Let's not fan embers of an unnecessary war. We have a handful of nuns and people from various religious groups who are also subjected to this exception and not just our Muslim sisters.

I still say she is a stupid human being.

Olivia Silk said...

🀣🀣🀣🀣🀣🀣🀣🀣🀣🀣

Anonymous said...

I don't really support this lady,bcos I feel Muslims usually try to have some excesses, but d truth is that if it is not enshrined in the law or written specifically (hijab) in their code of conduct , she's right and should b called. Anyways, I think they'll find a compromise

Lilly simple said...

Jixox
@ your last paragraph you made me lolzzzzzzzzπŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚

Anonymous said...

The Truth, don't know if you're male or female, but if you're female, I most say I appreciate your input. Your comment just made me wanna lift you up, put you in bed, undress you gently, go down on you, suck your cl*t like never before, till you come. Tuck you very well in bed, get to the kitchen and make you a very delicious indomie noddles, well done! That said, I would want to ask the hijab lady if it's also proper for Judges to wear hijab too while hearing a case? I can imagine a judge putting on hijab and giving a verdict to a case where the judged is a Christian.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...