Stella Dimoko Korkus.com: Nigerian Man 'Invictus Obi' Pleads Guilty To Wire And Computer Fraud In The US

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Monday, May 25, 2020

Nigerian Man 'Invictus Obi' Pleads Guilty To Wire And Computer Fraud In The US

Obinwanne Okeke, the Nigerian ‘businessman’ arrested in the United States last August, has capitulated after months of putting up spirited fights against the two-count charge of wire and computer fraud slammed on him by American authorities.



                  


Mr Okeke, also known as Invictus Obi in Nigeria, has now told American authorities he is ready to enter a guilty plea, possibly in exchange for a lesser sentence.

Already, a Senior United State District Judge, Rebecca Smith, has given an order approving the plea bargain arrangement.

“The Court has been advised that the defendant wishes to enter a plea of guilty,” Judge Smith said in her Order of April 24. “A United States Magistrate Judge is hereby authorised, with the consent of the defendant, to conduct the proceedings required by the Federal Rule of Criminal Procedure 11 incident to the making of the plea. See 28 U.S.C. Section (b) (1); United States v. Dees, 125 F.3d 261 (5th Cir.1997).

“The defendant may consent to the United States Magistrate Judge conducting the proceedings on a form provided by the clerk.

“If, after conducting such proceedings, the Magistrate Judge accepts the plea of guilty and the associated plea agreement, a presentence investigation shall be conducted and a report shall be prepared pursuant to Federal Rule of Criminal Procedure 32, and a sentencing data shall be scheduled.

“If the plea of guilty is accepted, the District Judge will adjudicate guilt and will determine and impose a sentence.”

Magistrate Judge Robert Krask has been appointed to conduct the plea agreement hearing set for June 18 at the Norfolk Magistrate Courtroom 1.

Mr Okeke’s capitulation is a surprising turn in the case as he has since his arrest strongly denied wrongdoing.

On December 15, 2019, he filed two preliminary objections. One saying American authorities lacked jurisdiction to charge him for fraud since he did not commit the alleged offence on American soil, and that no American companies or individuals were swindled at the time of his indictment.


In the other objection, Mr Okeke accused the Federal Bureau of Investigation of obtaining evidence from him and his iPhone under duress and that the information so extracted should be discountenanced by the court.

Responding to the objection, the prosecutors said Mr Okeke travelled to the U.S. in the course of the crime and that his lawyers were wrong to argue that no American companies or individuals were defrauded by the suspect.

The FBI also insisted it obtained evidence from Mr Okeke following due process.

But just as the parties agreed to continue the trial, Mr Okeke began to signal to the prosecution that he was ready for a guilty plea agreement. The court was so informed of the development.

Mr Okeke was arrested by the FBI on August 6 in Alexandria, Virginia, as he was about to return to Nigeria.

He was later charged with two counts of computer fraud and wire fraud, which carry a maximum penalty of 10 and 20 years jail, respectively.

U.S. authorities allege Mr Okeke defrauded the United Kingdom office of Unatrac of up to $11 million in business email fraud. Unatrac’s headquarters is in the United Arab Emirates, but the company filed complaints with the FBI through Caterpillar.
from premium times

38 comments:

  1. Where are his cohorts? I thought he went Tekashi on his team. They will give him a long time to serve in jail though.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think it's now he wants to go "Tekashi" on his team so they reduce his sentences like they did in 69's case...can't wait to see how it turns out

      Delete
    2. i guess he gets a lesser jail term if he pleads guilty and acts as witness against the accomplices

      Delete
    3. @kidjo me too I’m patiently waiting. Sadly the case is not in Nigeria where he can bribe his way through.
      13:45 yes. He’d get a lighter sentence if he snitched.

      Delete
    4. "Sadly the case is not in Nigeria where he can bribe his way through." wow, that says it all. May you not be a victim of fraud and loose all your hard earned money.

      Delete
    5. Hey papa! What is wrong with anons today? Did you read my comment wrong? I’m not in anyway advocating for bribery and corruption!!!! Don’t twist my words haba!

      Delete
    6. Picture G...Haha.Please forgive the anony,probably lost his savings to these fraudsters so he read you upside down.

      This Invictus nonhuman,I feel like dragging his nose,onye ori.

      Delete
  2. Nigerians.
    A lot go abroad to get money however and wherever.
    Any of them I meet outside Nigeria, I avoid them. They are unhinged whenever they are abroad.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. He didn't commit the crime in America aunty. Na you know why you dey avoid people.
      Holy saint.

      Delete
    2. @don
      So why is he pleading guilty?
      You think USA is like Nigeria where you do fraudulent acts and get away with it.
      If he was in Nigeria and fraudulently obtained monies from Americans by false pretense,
      he committed a crime against the USA and under international law should be extradited to
      face the music. He played himself into their hands by landing there to cash his ill-gains.
      I do not avoid people, I avoid fraudulent Nigerians abroad because if you are in contact with
      them by phones, emails etc, once the investigations start, you are in.

      Delete
    3. **** stop trying to change the topic. Don pointed out the stupidity in your statement about Nigerians you meet abroad by stating invictus did not LIVE abroad, so this has nothing to do with Nigerians living abroad. DUH.

      Delete
    4. Meanwhile, you are unhinged all the time from your comments on his blog.., just saying 😏

      Delete
    5. @13:54
      Please remove emotions from these whole stuff. I am talking about "fraudulent Nigerians" abroad; whether on visit or living there.
      I am only giving you a piece of advise, stay away from fraudulent Nigerians. If the investigation starts, you are an accomplice until proven otherwise.

      Delete
    6. *** is right in her decision. I was shocked to my roots when a Nigerian guy I did masters with was arrested and jailed for fraud. Just last year. Someone with masters from a top US university oh..the greed. Of course everyone around him was rounded up and had to clear their names. I don't avoid Nigerians generally but if I don't know where you work/ what you do, I'll keep my distance. I only move with people who have something to lose.

      Delete
    7. From "Any of them" in initial comment now to "fraudulent Nigerians".

      Clearly, now you see how silly it sounds when people generalise.

      Delete
    8. @15:24
      I think your problem is comprehension. "any of them" is a reference to the first sentence; "a lot of them go abroad to make money anywhere and anyhow".

      Delete
    9. NIB, that is not enough reason to generalise unless you and *** agree you are also into fraud.

      Delete
    10. You are advising indeed, attention seeker.

      Delete
  3. Wow they are still judging his case till now, thought he had already started serving time since.

    Just see his defenses he put up before, he was under duress? when you shot yourself in the foot and the FBI agent that was in charge of his case gave a well detailed analysis of how he was apprehended with his Ip address that matched various locations worldwide he was present at and his IG page also backed up the locations from his post, the email he used and also the recovery email attached to it, he should have pleaded guilty since and not trying to outsmart his way out of it 😩

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. He wanted to use the naija way of frustrating the court to elongate proceedings..

      E no no say na person wey breast know where moaning dey..😂

      Delete
    2. They think they are smarter than everyone else including the FBI, they really do.

      Delete
    3. He got the abbreviation mixed up. He thought he was dealing with EFCC not FBI

      Delete
    4. They take time to go to trial here. No need to rush. The first 72 hours after arrest is the most important. If they don’t have all the evidence, they release the person otherwise they charge within the 72 hours excluding weekends and holidays.

      Delete
  4. Omg 😯 so sad. People stop being greedy. It leads to unwanted end.

    ReplyDelete
  5. If you are guilty, the best thing is to accept it and plead guilty and cooperate, you'll get a lesser sentence..... If you do gra gra and decide to go to trial, they will finish you!!!


    Fraud is never the way, do the crime, do the time!!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Hahaha.. him don finally tired.
    He thought he was in Nigeria before, where they take you to court without thorough investigation.
    He was saying in didn't committed the crime on the soil of America before, who told him to change his story now.
    He's going for a long time..
    If you're into fraud, keep a low profile.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Your last line isn't encouraging bro... We should be kicking against fraudulent acts than encouraging low profile of it.

      Delete
    2. TeeJay, most of them do not maintain a low profile.

      Delete
    3. Anon 14.26 the point is we should speak AGAINST CRIME, rather than advocating for people to commit crime and maintain a low profile.

      Delete
  7. Set awon aspire to inspire.
    So he was guilty all along.
    If he can do the crime,he can also serve his time.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Na so now. Motivational speakers..

      Delete
  8. His people on this blog will not talk now, shebi you ppl were defending him before.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are funny. Who are his people on this blog?
      When he got arrested, did you see the entire list??
      It’s not just ibos that are engaged in these activities here. Yoruba sef follow. When it was Medicaid and Medicare fraud in Houston, it was mainly Akwa Ibom people that were arrested. They are just bad Nigerians.

      Delete
    2. Thank you for mentioning that Medicare and Medicaid fraud, a lot of people don't know. I've said it before on this blog, you'll be shocked. Doctors, nurses oh. People earning 6figures, still doing fraud. Isn't that greed? And when caught you lose your license, life's work, even kids. And with such criminal record you'll never get a good job. Not worth it at all, young ones. Do not be deceived.

      Delete
    3. His supporters are his people, anyone that supoorts you is your person. Why are you mentioning Yoruba in your comment. What has Yoruba got to do with this. Learn to stick to the topc and stop mentioning what has nothing to do with the topic.

      Delete
  9. If you want to do crime, go learn from Italians, Romanians and Rushians.
    Not using technologies brought to you by Americans to scam them.
    You are just a joke!

    Obi is about to sing like a canary.
    We are waiting.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Evey day for the thief;
    One day for the owner.

    The day of reckoning has arrived.
    Whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he reap.

    ReplyDelete

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