Stella Dimoko Korkus.com: Saturday In House Gists - Unforgettable Childhood Experiences And Regrets

Advertisement

Advertisement - Mobile In-Article

Saturday, December 04, 2021

Saturday In House Gists - Unforgettable Childhood Experiences And Regrets

 Do you have unforgettable childhood experiences that you smile or frown when you remember?







Do you have any Childhood regrets? things you wished you did or did not do?

Lets gist!
Make una make this post Interesting ooooh...

120 comments:

  1. None. Good afternoon Stella mama and Blog BVs.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My unforgettable childhood experience is I always looked forward going to my late great grandmother house in Majidun Ikorodu. my cousins and I enjoyed swimming in the Majidun river, I also enjoyed the Easter carnival (swimming competition, dancing and singing etc).
      Hmmmmmmmm I really missed my Great grandmother (her food,the pampering, all the late night stories πŸ˜”πŸ˜”πŸ˜”) we stop going to Majidun when she died.

      Delete
  2. Back then, we had lots of trees, and I LOVED to climb. It was like an everyday thing for me. Oh, and cartwheeling was my thing. Recently, I tried doing that, and I sprained my wrist. Never again.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Me too Candy
      I used to climb trees and pluck mangoes. One day I saw a snake on the tree above my head, I didn't know how I flew down from the tree. I had bruises on my body including my chest. The chest own turned to big sore and took long before it healed. Since then, no more tree climbing.

      Delete
  3. Not traveling out of the country at age 11.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Have you traveled out now?

      Delete
    2. There was this neighbour in our compound when we were growing up. He was what we call aproko, Area Radio and he lied a lot. He would see a girl talking to a boy and he will go tell your parent that they were pressing your boobs in a corner, I'm sure many people here can relate to this type of person. So all the kids avoided him. They hated and cursed him silently.
      I prayed never to cross parts with him as my parents were very strict.
      One evening, when I was 14, I was coming back from choir practice when one guy started following me, toasting me, I quickly increased my steps and even ran at a point. I didn't know that Mr Radio had seen him following me. He came to the house and told my dad that I was walking and holding hands with a guy while coming back from choir practice. My parents didn't allow me talk, they both beat me seriously and stopped me from going to choir practice. I painfully left the church choir.
      The incident hurt me so much and I cursed the man. We later left the area. When my elder sister got married he was invited, he came, saw me and apologized but I had already forgiven him long before that time. Now I listen to my kids' side of the story after the reporter has left, I don't just pounce on a child like that.

      Delete
    3. Most parents then na instant justice. Public one sef.

      Delete
  4. I was an introvert. I missed out on those childhood plays and dramas. I had few friends too. I never really enjoyed childhood.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Allow your children to enjoy childhood

      Delete
  5. I wish I disvirgined early ...now it's affecting me...I don't have much urge to it, I don't feel it raraaaaπŸ€”πŸ€”

    ReplyDelete
  6. Stella when I was in primary 2, I used to go to my grandmother's "shed/ shop after school because it's closer to my school.
    1 afternoon as I was coming immediately she sighted me coming she hastened up and held my hand then we walked fast to her shed. Getting there, a man/Lorry driver had used his lorry to scatter my grandma's table and her goods poured on the ground.
    My mamannuku said to me, nwam,nwokea mebisiti ngwa ahiam bia n'asurum onyibo😑 biko gosiya na enwerem onye ma asu onyibo(my daughter this man scattered my goods and came out of his car to speak English for me, SHOW HIM I HAVE SOMEONE THAT CAN SPEAK ENGLISH 😳.
    Me pointing different items in the market..
    Oga this is a fish
    Grandma: Ada supuu!!

    Me: Oga look at your lorry

    Grandma: subaraya!!

    Me: Oga this is a mango

    Grandma:πŸ’ƒπŸΎπŸ’ƒπŸΎπŸ’ƒπŸΎπŸ’ƒπŸΎ

    Me: Oga do you know the name of my school??

    Grandma: Ada jisike!!
    My grandma and her neighbors were cheering me with louuuuud clap!!
    The man was just laughing

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lemmeee oooo������������ you be case

      Delete
    2. your craze didn't start today, area scatter

      Delete
    3. Haahaahaahaa, Fan, what will we do without you!!

      Delete
    4. Fan why naπŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ€£πŸ€£. Which schoolπŸ˜‚, use English to fight you dey ask question

      Delete
    5. πŸ€£πŸ€£πŸ˜‚

      Delete
    6. 🀣🀣🀣🀣🀣fan,can never carry last

      Delete
    7. πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚

      Delete
    8. 🀣🀣🀣

      Delete
    9. πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚

      What did I just read?

      Delete
    10. 🀣🀣🀣 this my Fan u no go kill me o πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚

      Delete
    11. Oga this is a mango

      Oga do you know the name of my school?
      Is that the compensation you should have demanded for? 🀣🀣🀣🀣🀣🀣🀣

      Delete
    12. πŸ˜‚ πŸ˜‚ πŸ˜‚ πŸ˜‚ πŸ˜‚ πŸ˜‚
      Fan ooooo

      Delete
    13. 🀣🀣🀣🀣🀣🀣🀣

      Delete
    14. πŸ˜‚πŸ€£πŸ€£πŸ€£πŸ€£
      Chaai Chinekenna mo! Your whole life is a comic movie i swear, lmao! Poor innocent grandma thought you were making her proud🀣. Lmfao

      Delete
    15. I fell over at Ada supuu!! Thanks for a good laugh as always.

      Delete
    16. Chai nwam supuuuu. Hahahahahaha

      Delete
    17. Faaaan ooooo u will not kee sombori 🀣🀣🀣🀣. I must always look for ur post cos I know it will cheer me up!!

      Delete
    18. Fannn oooo
      ChaiπŸ˜†πŸ˜†πŸ˜†πŸ˜†πŸ˜†

      Delete
  7. One unforgettable child experience I had.

    When we were kids, my brother likes to buy ewa agoyin from one woman that shouts, "ewa agoyin ti de” every Saturday in our compound.
    This fateful Saturday, after buying ewagoyin, he sent me across the street to buy agege bread. My mum is someone who doesn't allow us to go out, so all these errands were always done behind her back.
    I dashed across the street without looking left or right, that's how one bike came from nowhere and hit me. I fell to the ground with plenty of bruises. But agege bread and not getting caught was my mission, so all the Kpele dear was not entering my ears as I quickly stood up to buy the bread and went back home pretending like nothing happened.

    Later that evening, we heard a knock on our door. Mama Ibeji, the woman called, "I came to greet you." How's your twin doing now? My mum was surprised, twin doing how? The woman went further to say the one that was involved in an accident. From the room, even my 8 years old self knew I was in trouble. What kind of alakoba is this?

    My mum was like my children have been indoor since(yimu), the woman insisted and said bike hit one of them earlier, that's why I came to check on her. After my mum confirmed that it was me, she thanked the woman and the alakoba left. I chop serious beating on top of my bruised body. You'd think I'd be pitied. Na lie, my mum made sure she taught me a lesson with that beating, after which she massaged my body with hot water, gave me paracetamol and told me to go and sleep.
    Bad enough my brother didn't even give me from the beans and bread, his excuse was I didn't contribute. I went through the stress, accident, and beating for nothing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. πŸ˜…πŸ˜… Nigerian mothers! why beat you when she will still massage your body, is that not adding pepper to injury

      Delete
    2. Haha, that was how me and my friend had minor accident on the way to ago iwoye from Abeokuta. Thank God none of us was wounded, but I couldn't tell my mum cos she never knew I left Abeokuta,it was a one day journey, my friend went to check admission list and I followed, only for the mum to give testimony in church, we attend the same church, I almost followed pastor home that day, cos I know my mother go finish me

      Delete
    3. Your brother wicked o πŸ˜‚

      Delete
    4. Children shaπŸ˜€. Your brother didn't know you had an accident? If he knew, maybe he would have compensate you with small beans and bread

      Delete
    5. I had a very similar experience. My own was because of all these useless Guiness promo. You know those types they will tell u to gather like 10 ‘counters’ and put in envelope and submit at the nearest depo to receive useless gifts. Na so I gather my own finish. As I was going to cross the road to go drop it off at the depo, I was so in a haste to go drop off that I didn’t look at the road properly before crossing and one car almost hit me. It was so so close that people were screaming. I was sha thankful that it didn’t hit me. I went to submit my ‘counters’

      When my mum got back from market, I dunno the amebo that already downloaded the gist for her before she got to the house. She called and asked me where I was going that a car almost hit me. I explained.

      With cain, my mum was asking me ‘so u want to die because of gift that u will never receive’?

      As she was asking, she was flogging me on my palms.

      Till today, I never heard back from those ppl. Na sΓ³ person for die for nothing. God forbid

      Delete
  8. Mine was during my teenage years(15yrs) I used to give my cousin who was a year and six months my boobs to suck whenever he was crying inorder for him to stop......
    I can't imagine someone doing that to my child now!

    ReplyDelete
  9. I enjoyed my childhood very well, cooked sand rice did children play mummy and daddy, but you adulthood is a big scam, bills won't allow you enjoy plus fake friends

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. you see that cooking sand rice ehn e dey sweet die. Plus all the seriousness in making it as if it's going to be eaten. Maybe that's why I turned out a good cook sef

      Delete
    2. πŸ‘ŒπŸ‘ŒπŸ‘Œ

      Delete
    3. I’m not sure there was any local childhood game in Lagos I didn’t play. Even ‘Lagos, Stop’, ‘omoba fawusa’, mummy and daddy play.

      Kids of this generation will never know those kinds of fun sha

      Delete
    4. Eka Joy kids of this generation you say? dey there, the ajekpako kids are still very much having this kind of fun

      Delete
  10. I played very very very very very well.i have enough scares and broken skull to show for it.i always carry last in my class,I repeated class 2 times in primary school,f9 parallel in secondary school,I didn't know how I gained admission into university of Lagos at one sitting.my childhood was fun and play for me.i was a happy child.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hahaha Hahahaha too funny.u mean u gained admission with f9parallel,it can't be true

      Delete
    2. Chai I can imagine the tough time you gave your parents and older ones. They must have screamed and shouted their lungs out trying to correct you and get you to be serious. I'm sure you used to dodge taking your bath too and urinate on the bed.

      Delete
    3. πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚ @Deheroine.
      Anon u are very funny πŸ˜…πŸ˜…

      Delete
    4. 🀣🀣🀣🀣

      Delete
  11. The rΓ©cent stories making rounds on SM made me remember boarding school. Terrible place especially for the very little ones. Good thing is most boarders are self motivated or driven. In boarding school I was exposed to lesbianism, bullying etc. God be praised I had a loud mouth and big friends who shielded me.

    ReplyDelete
  12. My siblings and I loved it whenever it rained because of "shinge"(termite),we always caught and fried them garnished with salt and small pepper,we enjoyed it alot ,our dad never complained,out of the blues one day,he suddenly called all of us while we were busy gathering our spoil,the flogging he gave us deleted the love of shinge and up till now,I can't eat it and that koboko he used on us eeeh, nna my dad missed his calling, he's supposed to be a military man walahi,continue to rest in peace papa'm.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I hunted for termites too πŸ˜…πŸ˜… once it rains and there's light, they come out and we catch plenty of it.

      Delete
  13. Memories..... Ajegunle street in Isheri,ojodu. Is it the rolling on tire while wearing only pant all around the place after school everyday, we'll make cake with plenty Harris and sugar and cook sand food with real fire. I remember the day I followed my friends to boarder to play,mama beat me ehn. By this period my dad would have bought our clothes 'Odun kekere'christmas (readymade) and 'odun nla'new year (cut and sew). We'll now go to LtV8 Christmas funfair and do request on TV with our paper cone shaped cap. I wish I can do this for my children too, no Christmas clothes gan not to talk of going out. Omo I enjoyed my childhood o but,I can't give my children the kind of free hand we had then,I can't imagine me leaving them to go play in three or four houses away without wearing anything order than pant with big blom blom navel

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. @πŸ˜… blom blom navel

      Delete
    2. Your last sentence
      Hahahahahahahahahahahahaha





      Delete
    3. That rolling tire thing ehn. My brother will be rolling and I will be following all the way from our house at Ojogbe close to General hospital to Ebute. Inside Ebute fa for people that know ikorodu.

      Delete
    4. I reside around there now.

      Delete
  14. I was three, a visitor came to see my mum one hot afternoon.
    My mum entertained her with very chilled Malta Guinness, the lady now called me “my baby, come and drink small” seeing that I was looking at her malt and salivating.
    My mum was giving me “the look” my longer throat did not let me understand the meaning of the look.
    I sat on the visitors lap and was drinking the malt with her happily.
    After the visitor left, hey god, my mum did not even let her go far I heard tawai! On my back, the beating I received that day made me hate malt till date, that was the first time my mum ever beat me, and she never stopped since then.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 🀣🀣🀣🀣🀣

      Delete
    2. The lasting effects of somethings. Funny.

      Delete
    3. but you're the visitor's baby na 🀣🀣🀣

      Delete
    4. πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚ alonger longer!!

      Delete
    5. OlojukokoroπŸ˜†. But some of you have sharp memory o, you still remember what happened when you were three?

      Delete
    6. Who didn’t suffer this one sha. They will now make u stand far and be staring longingly at visitors drinking soft drink πŸ˜‚

      Delete
    7. πŸ˜‚ πŸ˜‚ πŸ˜‚ πŸ˜‚ πŸ˜‚
      Instant justice I tell ya.....
      I can still remember the sharp konks I received.

      Delete
  15. I didnt have a beautiful childhood experience. My dada died early and I became a mother when I was 10 years while my mum was our dad. I was always cooking, taking care of my 6 months old sister and my brothers as well as playing other motherly roles. I am happy it made me who I am today. It's just that I am in my 40s and not yet a mother.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. aww cheer up anon very soon very very soon it will happen for you

      Delete
    2. May God grant u favor and settle u maritally IJN

      Delete
    3. Eyaah! God will remember you anon. I was happy when you said it shaped you but became sad reading your last line.

      Delete
    4. Oh dear. May God give you as many children as you want.

      Delete
    5. This is so touching. May God come through for you anon.

      Delete
    6. I'm sorry for what you are going through. You will smile soon in Jesus name

      Delete
    7. Be slightly a girl don't act over mature

      Delete
  16. The day my mum gave me and my sis 10 naira note as our break/lunch,we were in primary school,one is to get 5naira each, we fought on the road and we decided to split ,we couldn't find someone to change the money, and me with the mumu brain decided to share the money into 2 equal half, gave her one half ,and I took the other, the beating I received from my mum that day ehn, cos we both couldn't spend the money

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. πŸ˜†πŸ˜† you already said you with the mumu brain, no need adding that for you.

      Delete
    2. πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚

      Delete
    3. πŸ˜‚πŸ˜ƒπŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚

      Delete
  17. One childhood memory that I can never forget was drinking one full bottle of kerosine my uncle offered me as coca cola.

    I was around 5/6, when my parents divorced. My mom relocated from Calabar to her father's house in Obudu. Since it was a big family house, food became a scarce commodity. No matter the quantity of food cooked, it was never enough because of the population.

    That was how yours truly started doing 'longer throat'. I will collect food from both family and strangers. Sometimes, I won't even wait for you to offer the food, I will either beg or take it without permission. I didn't know that my uncle was devising means to make me stop my new acquired longer throat behavior.

    One fateful day, I overheard him telling one of my cousins that he kept a bottle of Coke for him in his room. That when he's done with his house chores, he should go and carry the Coke. When my ears heard 'coke' my body started shaking. That was how I went into my uncle's room and carried the said bottle of Coke, and gulped it down, foolish me I didn't even perceive the smell of kerosine. When I finished the 'coke' I sneaked out of my uncle's room and started throwing up. Immediately, the adults around started asking what I ate, I said I drank Coke in my uncle's room. They later found out that I had gulped down one full bottle of kerosene.

    I was given all manner of concoction so that I could throw up the whole thing from my system. When I had regained myself, I confessed to my mom. Trust African mothers, my mom beat me until I almost passed out.My uncle later told my mom that he did that to make me stop my longer Throat. My mother was livid with anger. That incident put a strain in their relationship. It was during my wedding that my mom forgave my uncle. Up until today, I don't eat from people.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ha your uncle has strong mind o,what if you die from it's complications?

      Delete
    2. At least you learnt from it.

      Delete
    3. πŸ˜₯πŸ˜₯ oh dear! God saved you. That wasn't the best way your uncle should have gone about it. Something bad could have happened to you. Glad you learnt from it

      Delete
    4. Thank God you didn't die from it. A kid died from drinking kerosene when I was little

      Delete
    5. Sometimes in order to teach a lesson people go to far.

      Delete
    6. Your uncle shouldn't have done that!

      Delete
    7. That was wickedness on the part of that uncle. You could have died. Can he do such to his own child or grandchild?

      Delete
  18. Hmmnn, thinking about it now, I realised that I did the right thing but then, I felt guilty. Ok, my mom loooves reporting me to whoever, then she no too send me unlike now that we are five and six. She reported me to one adigboroja pastor that met me retuning from school, the mumu man proceeded to ask me to follow him. We landed in his friend's house who promptly excused us. Thank God that I was somehow worldly wise as a result of loads of books I've read. Oga pastor then gradually pushed me towards the bed, and stood up to unbuckle his belt. Subconsciously, I kicked him in the nuts and gently went out. He wrighted in pains and followed me to ask me not to tell anyone, which I didn't. I felt my mom will say na the evil spirit wey dey worry me.
    I was barely 13 yrs old, wit sweaty smelly teenage odours, bushy uncombed hair, plenty pimples, even my pants was 'superman' cartoon sef. I wonder what sort of joy such men derived. For long I felt guilty of nearing bursting his nuts but now my joys knows no bounds, I for even use my hand comot am go throwaway inside the nwangele stream.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Some mothers and the habit of reporting their kids to 'pastors' that was how a neighbor's mum recently told her daughter that a pastor is calling for her. She obeyed the mum and went, he said she has evil spirit and held her waist and was shaking it vigorously. She said her whole body was shaking and he was commanding the evil spirit to come out. So evil spirit didn't see any other part of the body it's waist. she came back and warned her mum never to ask her to go to such place again. She narrated it to us and we couldn't stop laughing even though it's not funny.

      Delete
  19. For Agu street Achara Layout Enugu that year, if you get fow for our street that time and didn't cage them, sorry be your name, because we go use am do matata. Olisa get the rice stealing, Anene get all the ingredients for cooking the rice and Obinna get the cooking pot, kerosene, stove, water etc and I as the female among them get the cooking. every Saturday evening, mama chinenye dey look for her fow, we no be thieves but if your fow cross boundary on Saturdays just forget about it, our parents never get to know about this our little secret uptil date, we be saints for their eyes πŸ™„

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Una be thief abeg, your mates are cooking with sand you're catching and cooking real fowl πŸ˜₯πŸ˜…

      Delete
    2. You guys took people's fowls, cooked and ate them? Una no be thieves true true

      Delete
  20. Hmmm I remember Dec 31st 1999 when everyone was fusing about 2000, I was only 9 years old then. But the atmosphere then on okepopo str in Lagos Island was contagious. Every one shouting the new millennium etc. Everyone was so excited and overjoyed. I cant forget that night,. What I was wearing I don't know why my mind singled out this event bit I always remember that night
    I also skipped alot, played suwe etc
    We did cultural practice etc

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nne come and read this thing you wrote here, read it slowly, does it have meaning to you?
      When they correct and try to teach you people, una go say "who English epp?" See am nowπŸ‘©‍🦯

      Delete
    2. 19.18 🀣🀣

      Delete
    3. Anon,I did,if you can't.comprehend that's your lost.pls allow people to breathe.

      Delete
  21. Stella I remember Christmas.
    My mum will take us one by one to the market and buy oversized shoes and clothes for us. Till the shoes will peel off and condemn, they won't size us πŸ˜‚
    The clothes will size us when they had started fading already πŸ˜‚
    I remember Promise card🀣🀣

    Bvs does promise card still exist? Oh the world has changed, now it is not even advisable for a child to be taking promise card around before one paedophile will hijack the fun.

    ReplyDelete
  22. When I was around 6 or 7, I used to throw serious tantrums when I got offended, on this particular day, I can't even remember what my mum did to make me revolt, and in my anger, I threw a pencil I was holding, the pencil missed her eyeball by maybe an inch or less, omoooo, my mom used beating to rearrange my brain. Afterwards, she tied my leg to our bedpost with a piece of cloth like a piece of goat you don't want stealing your yamπŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚, and locked me in the room, only opened the door to drop my plate of food at the bedpost. I was there till late in the evening after everyone in the compound had come to beg on my behalf. I stopped throwing things in anger after that day.

    ReplyDelete
  23. My childhood was interesting,I remember building houses with sand, especially when it rains,I remember cooking rice with empty peak milk tin and building cars with tins hmmmm life was so beautiful and safe then,during Christmas we will family friendsand we don't usually eat when we get there,because we know if we eat,they may not give us Christmas money(owo Odun) which we usually gather inside piggybank(woodtype) lol so much to remember! It fun looking back at the little things we didn't count then,things are so different now,may God heal our land

    ReplyDelete
  24. The only regret I have about my growing up is having sex before marriage. I wish it didn't happen πŸ˜”

    ReplyDelete
  25. I regret furthering my education under my mum sponsorship, should have learn hand work and school train myself since I have the brain.

    ReplyDelete
  26. l was raped at the age of 5yrs by a relative!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's well my love

      Delete
    2. Please be encouraged
      Sorry
      Please forgive for your peace sake

      Be & stay strong

      Delete
  27. I was so playful. Suwe, red light- green light, cooking with milk tin and leaves, playing with sand. Walking from 512 in festac round the whole area. How we beg each othe for ice cream. I was a child that Liked to abuse. Mine was too much, if my mum sent me on errand in the evening , na so fear go they catch me because I will see someone I had abused lurking in the corner waiting to beat me, I will run so fast and just go and tell my mother that I didn’t see the person she sent me to. How I used to hide dirty pita under the sink because I felt it was too hard to wash, my mum would see it, wake me up to come and wash it. I was damp too restless to study. Every time my mum comes tor open day, I go just weak if my teacher begins to report me. I has serious potential but play no gree me o, didn’t discover my academic prowess till I enter uni,

    ReplyDelete
  28. I can’t forget when I was about 7 years old and was ill. I was on injections. I noticed that adults never cried when injected, I think say na the pant wey dem Dey wear no let them cry as they come out with dry eye. Na so u wear my papa pant the next day. Come see laff for health CENTRE for 41 road that day.

    ReplyDelete

Disclaimer: Comments And Opinions On Any Part Of This Website Are Opinions Of The Blog Commenters Or Anonymous Persons And They Do Not Represent The Opinion Of StellaDimokoKorkus.com

Pictures and culled stories posted on this site are given credit and if a story is yours but credited to the wrong source,Please contact Stelladimokokorkus.com and corrections will be made..

If you have a complaint or a story,Please Contact StellaDimokoKorkus.com Via

Sdimokokorkus@gmail.com
Mobile Phone +4915210724141