Stella Dimoko Korkus.com: Yoruba Cuisines To Try Out!!!

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Friday, February 23, 2018

Yoruba Cuisines To Try Out!!!

Excuse me please.....Moin Moin is Yoruba Cuisine?Are you Kidding me?!




The Yoruba tribe are very good at Entertainment and good food. They have a number of mouthwatering and finger licking meals that will leave you demanding for more.....


Pounded yam and egusi soup


Pounded yam is mostly eaten with egusi (melon soup). Pounded yam is made by boiling yam unsalted and pounding it when it becomes soft. Ondo and Ekiti people are known to be fond of pounded yam.




Ewa aganyin


Ewa aganyin is made up of cooked beans and pepper sauce. It is a delicious beans dish, well-known for its softness and tasty sauce. You can eat Ewa Aganyin with bread to savour and appreciate the meal.



Adalu


Adalu is a combination of beans and corn, pepper and palm oil cooked together with seasoning and spices. It is quite delicious.



Moin Moin


Moin Moin is a Nigerian staple food which is very rich in protein. It is a cooked bean pudding made from a combination of grounded peeled beans, pepper, and onions. It can be eaten with rice, pap and bread.



Eba and efo riro


Eba serves as an alternative for pounded yam. People who do not want to go through the stress of pounding yam prefer eating Eba. Eba is usually taken with Efo Riro (Vegetable soup) which makes the meal more delicious and nutritious.



Amala, ewedu and gbegiri soup


Amala is made from yam into flour and Ewedu is a leaf blended into watery soup. This delicacy is a local dish of the Oyo state people. Amala is better enjoyed alongside Ewedu and Gbegiri.

By Adeniyi Ogunfowoke



*Never heard of Adalu before!!!


70 comments:

  1. I've not tasted amala all my life, one day I will.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We should port you to Syria for saying what you just said...How come 😯😯😯😯 plus you come to lagos,abi you be northerner.


      LEPπŸ˜›

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    2. Never too. I don't even intend to

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    3. BlackBerry I beg of you pls try it out
      You are missing greatly

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    4. You don't know what you're Mizzin

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    5. Hopefully pepper won't be toomuch in d amala.

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    6. Adalu is lovely. It's beans and corn cooked together.

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    7. Amala, one of my favorites.. ... I had it as lunch all through my stay in camp, Na food wey no Dey tire me!! !

      It's kinda difficult to find people that can make correct ewedu and obe

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    8. Blackberry and Eka Joy una dey miss o! Amala ati ewedu pelu gbegiri ati ogunfe!! Very tasty. Adalu epo is bae! Beans and corn. I love eforiro, infact i eat yoruba delicacies wella. Na hausa delicacy i dey fear to chop especially that black soup but i eat wanke da shinkafa, tuwo and masa. Food is bae but not when you are on diet

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    9. Amala is bae but I can't eat that gbegiri

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  2. Agonyin a Yoruba delicacy? I beg to differ please!

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    Replies
    1. Agoyin is not a yoruba delicacy o! I think its Togo delicacy

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  3. Adalu is beans and corn mixed together in palmoil...damn,i crave it now.H.L.

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  4. So many of these dishes are vegetarian friendly. So tired of hearing about the meat heavy dishes. Gonna check out some of these vegan dishes. Thanks!

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  5. I thought Ewa Aganyin is for the togo people.
    The boarding school I attended made me hate this combo. Just knowing the name is even Adalu, we use to call it beans and corn. Very nonsense food if I may say so.

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    Replies
    1. Minnie Respect, 're you a Badorian

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    2. They probably didn't cook it well. You know aw boarding house school food be like na but it's a really nice dish

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    3. Togolese are yorubas

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  6. Adalu =beans + corn (mixture)

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  7. How can moi moi be Yoruba cuisine ? I wish to taste amala and ewedu someday

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    Replies
    1. In the description, it was described as a Nigerian dish not yoruba. It's safe to say that moi moi is not peculiar to any tribe.

      My mama's moi moi is d best tho

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    2. Pls do Amanda
      With Ewedu and Gbegiri

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    3. The word moin moin is Yoruba, what is it called in your language. Maybe you should start calling food in your language instead of calling food in the Yoruba language.

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    4. OK, Mrs yoruba, what does moin moin mean in yoruba? We call it mai mai

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    5. I wish to taste Amala too. I just have this feeling I won’t like it at all

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    6. Wow @eka joy. Maimai is a bastardisation of moin moin. It generally means mixture and was served by Oyo people who used palmoil instead of vegetable oil. It was originally called Γ’Γ²lΔ™ and the leaves used for wrapping are predominantly found in the West. This also serves as proof of history.

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    7. @eka joy. Which one be mai mai. LMAO!

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    8. So eka joy why do you keep lying that you are not a Calabar girl??? Which language is 'eka'?

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    9. Eka Joy is from Akwa Ibom a.k.a Ibibio not Calabar

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  8. I will love to taste Amala someday. The only yoruba food i don't is the use of tin abi fresh to cook vegetable soup.

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    Replies
    1. Queen Amy I bet you will like it

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    2. Yes Eka dear, moin-moin or moyin-moyin is a traditional Yoruba cuisine. Because it became diffused and adopted easily by other tribes they call it moi-moi or mai-mai.

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  9. Someday I'm going to taste this popular Amala and ewedu or gbegiri.

    Moi moi garnished with titus fish is bae. I want!!

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  10. Moi-moi not moin moin. Originated from Igodomigodo empire.

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    Replies
    1. Igodomigodo ko, obomooko ni. Imbecile. Some of you say rubbish with confidence.

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  11. I am ALWAYS very scared to try out new food. But that dish up there looks yummy..

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  12. My mum loves Adalu like kilode. She particularly plants corn during corn season for the sole purpose of this.

    It's a really good dish if the corn is cooked really soft

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    Replies
    1. Joy not mama only
      I love adalu with a lot of onions and palm oil with little Maggi.
      Mom in law use to beg me anytime I visit to help her prepare it,she will now store in the fridge.

      Delete
  13. Moi moi is a delicacy that was brought back from the caribbeans by the yoruba slaves. Other common food with same origin includes, Dodo, Akara, Chin chin, coconut candy, etc. I learnt this from a program about Lagos street food culture on LTV during the 50yrs celebration of Lagos.

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    1. Very true .
      I’m from the Caribbean and what you wrote is very true.
      Akara is known as Akaraje

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    2. @kiki this is the beauty and strength of the yoruba culture. Akara is very traditionally ingrained into the yoruba religion. Most Brazillian slaves were Yorubas taken away and they did not forget their culture and tradition. The Brazillian slaves whom are predominantly Yorubas brought it back but put a twist in it by using veg. oil instead of palm oil.It is actually food offered to some god during a particular yoruba festival.

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  14. OMG see better eba and efo riro. Abeg make i receive money, i will do the efo riro. Let me call my sister to get ready for this. THis cant pass me by

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  15. Adalu is what we call githeri in Kenya. We make it beans, white corn, carrots, peas and spices.
    I hated that food. All boarding schools serve it, since it's very affordable.

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  16. I like moin moin. Washing the beans is my problem as I don't like using bean flour.

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  17. Adalu is one food you enjoy, use a freshly cut corn to cook the beans, o dun baje

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  18. Amala and ewedu is divine. I served at Ibadan-BCOS Ile Akede. Years later i attended a conference at Ibadan-i had to go to one Amala joint around U.I. Here in PH i am yet to see an authentic amala joint. If you know one please spill.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Go to GRA after Genesis their amala is bae

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    2. There's a lady in ph town think off aggrey be4 d ram suya place just ask around. Places full in ph

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  19. Ewa agonyin means beans from Agonyin people. It isn't Yoruba. It is Togolese. But it became a Lagos street food that is popular amongst the Yoruba.

    Moinmoin - is a staple Yoruba food. It is usually steamed in leaves and sold that way in villages. It was one of the joy of going back to the village for Christmas back in the 80s & 90s. It comes with boiled egg & roasted fish. And it is usually eaten on its own or with ogi or with eko.

    Moinmoin elepo - steamed beans with palm oil.

    Ekuru - white moin moin

    Adaalu - is simply beans porridge with corn. It can have tomato sauce or be cooked longer to thicken the tomato sauce. So no, it isn't just cooked with beans, corn and palm oil. It is an Ijebu food.

    Ikokore - is water yam porridge.

    Gbegiri - white beans stew. It is popular in Ijebuland and Oyo state. It can be eaten as just porridge or with rice or with ewedu & any starch or with ila (okra) & any starch. But most popular combination is Gbegiri, Ewedu, Beef & Eba.

    Eberipo/Ibiripo - another Ijebu food. It is simply cocoyam fritters.

    Laafu - looks like fufu. I don't know what it is made from. Maybe an Ijebu name for fufu. But their texture is slightly different from the other. And the smell too.

    Fufu - I believe some ethnic groups call it akpu

    Iyan - pounded yam. Can be eaten within any soup or stew.

    Obe Apon - the igbo and SS people call this Ogbono soup. Ogbono to us is Apon.

    Akara - beans fritters

    Ojojo - water yam fritters

    Obe Egusi - egusi stew

    Efo elegusi - egusi & vegetable stew. Vegetable can be efo gure, efo tete, efo shoko.

    Obe eja tutu - fresh fish soup.

    Ila alasepo - okra soup

    Efo elemimeje - vegetable stew with 7 different proteins

    Ofada - this is another Ijebu delicacy. Most popular in Ijebu-Remo. It is simple fried green stew with ofada rice

    Aadun - grounded corn & palm oil

    Egusi onikoko - lumpy egusi stew

    Ewedu alasepo - ewedu soup

    Egusi ijebu - egusi soup cooked in ijebu style

    Obe Awo - Guinea fowl stew

    Mosa - ripe plantain fritters.

    Ata din din - fried red stew

    Obe igba - fried garden egg stew

    Dundun - fried yam

    Dodo - fried plantain

    Odunkun - fried sweet potato

    Koko - fried/steamed cocoyam

    Kokoro - fried corn snack. Very popular in egbaland.

    Kuli kuli - groundnut snack. Similar to kokoro. I believe it is Northern snack but it is quite popular in Lagos.

    Asaro - yam porridge

    Asun - roasted goat meat

    Obe epiya - tilapia soup

    Obe panla - stockfish soup

    Obe eja aro - catfish soup

    Obe eja yiyan - smoked fish soup

    Obe Eja osan/Shawa/Kote - soup of different types of fishes.

    Isu, epo pupa ati iyo - cooked/roasted yam with palm oil & salt.

    Garri - with epa, water, sugar & roasted fish

    Eba - cooked garri

    Eko - steamed corn. Looks like moinmoin but made with corn starch. Also usually steamed in leaves.

    Ogi - pap. Comes in different types. Ogi pupa and etc.

    N.B:

    The soups usually have less oil but the stews require deep frying, so the Yoruba tends to put a lot of oil. But there are tricks to frying the soup with less oil.

    The Yoruba cooks for intense flavour, rather than nutrition. This is an explanation for those who don't get the reason for the excess oil.


    A lot of Nigerian/even African delicacies are similar but called different names. I have seen Gabonese & Ghanaian people cook some of these foods and some other Nigerian ethnic groups' foods but they call them different names. Some of them also use a slightly different technique to cook their foods.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh, P.S. Amala - dried yam skin cooked with hot water.

      Delete
    2. Oh, P.S.S:

      Boli (roasted plantain) & epa (groundnuts) or boli, epa and palm oil. I normally see other ethnic groups eat it with roasted aubergines as a kid. I guess that's their variation of it. I saw some on IG saying they eat it with roasted fish in the South.

      Guguru - I think this is roasted peanuts.

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    3. Though, orogbo (bitter kola) & obi (kolanuts) are eaten as snacks, they are a staple in Yoruba culture that younger generations abandoned and look down on. They are good for the health as well as used for prayers during naming ceremonies and wedding.

      igba (garden egg) is also eaten as a snack by the Yorubas.

      Delete
  20. Up until yesterday I din't know the English name for moi moi was steamed beans pudding. We learn everyday gaskiya. Pounded yam and egusi is a Yoruba food? If I hear. That was how I ate one egusi soup in ekiti state it took me four days to brush the taste and smell off my taste buds. I had to rely on gala and coke till I left that town for fear of stooling. Every restaurant I entered was a disappointment, even the tosh once sef na rubbish. I had to travel back to abuja before I could get good pizza and shawarma I was craving for for days in ekiti. Am sorry but most Yoruba people cant cook good meals thats why I always respect the calabar folks abeg, they leave you almost eating ur finger after tasting their delicacy. I am feeling sleepy so I am not in the mood to argue but feel free to argue with your phones.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are so myopic in your thinking, how many Yoruba peoples food have you eaten that you say Most Yoruba people cannot cook good meals.

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    2. Am not Yoruba but men their foods are nice. The only thing is the pepper Kia that is where my problem lies. I don't eat eba but if i have to, it has to be omi one and efo

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  21. Adalu is bae....My craving for it is on level 100.

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  22. Amala lafun and gbegiri+ewedu soup with ogufe/eran igbe is bae.

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  23. I do not like beans but I loveeeeee beans and corn. Like I could eat it all day. At a point in secondary school, I used to send my mum letter through my guardian to bring beans and corn for me(during rainy season) as against the traditional jollof rice that parents bring on visiting days; the craving was that bad. I'm still in love with that meal till date.
    Pounded yam is another favourite; I could eat it without soup if I had to. Please just make sure my morsel is smooth to touch without 'koko' and I'm good to go.

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  24. Amala ati ewedu + orishishi meat... Chaiiii... Now ayam starving, work done close today, I can't Coman goan kee myself...

    #Rosie mai chin-chin...

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  25. Lafun belongs to the Egba people of Abeokuta. You are really on point with ofada rice from Remo.The stew is from green unripe pepper giving it that unique taste. just give me fried plantain and ofada stew ....I am good.

    ReplyDelete
  26. Kolanut and orogbo are not snacks oo!!They are used as stimulants.

    ReplyDelete
  27. My best is ofada rice and ata sauce. Can eat that all day

    ReplyDelete

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