Stella Dimoko Korkus.com: EX Gov. Gbenga Daniel’s Son Adebola Narrates What Physically Challenged People Go Through In Nigeria

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Wednesday, January 04, 2023

EX Gov. Gbenga Daniel’s Son Adebola Narrates What Physically Challenged People Go Through In Nigeria

 Awwwww this made me sad but he hit the nail on the head.... Can this Narrative ever be changed in Nigeria?


 







73 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. But his dad is a politician, they should have made that a priority in Ogun state.

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    2. How many things can one governor do

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  2. Eyah. I felt pity reading this. Nigeria still has a long way to go in terms of what he talked about. How many public places have infrastructure in place for the person on wheelchair?
    Schools? hospitals? Shopping malls? Banks? Car parks? Bus terminals? Places of worship? Name them. I feel for them in this country and wonder how they go about their lives here.

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  3. Nigeria has a very long way to go when to comes to inclusion for differently abled individuals.

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  4. It can be all shades of humiliating attimes

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  5. Almost broke down reading this. One of the things I have always dreaded, is being differently abled in Naija. Cos omoh mehn, even people wey dey physically fit no dey find am funny at all for dis kontri. Then imagine those who need a bit of help/assistance, to do certain stuff? God be with you brother. ❤️

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    1. You can say "disabled". It's not a bad thing. God knows I hate this "differently abled" that Nigerians seem to love so much. The person clearly wrote disabled but no! Righteous Nigerians must think it's a very bad term.

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    2. Anon 15:44, nah, not righteous - it's their ableism and sense of superiority expressed as faux empathy.

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    3. Always hiding under anonymous to attack people's comments.
      That you "hate" the term, doesn't make it wrong. I have chosen what term to use, use yours and allow others breathe. Make God forbid make people like una become president for dis kontri. Mtscheewww

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    4. Ali B don't mind them.

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    5. Hahaha @15.44
      You think Nigerians are bad, come America and see the terms change every year. You think you are using the correct term and one SJW from nowhere will tell you “differently abled is discriminatory, you should use ‘super-abled’ instead

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    6. anon 15.44..see how I roared with laughter at your comment forgetting briefly that this matter is serious ..super wetin?

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  6. Nigeria is a country where victims are a used and blamed. Ranging fro. Physically challenged people - divorced people- Barren people - broke people - tape victims etc.. They just want to blame and abuse people.

    HI Martin's.. Agin, could you please drop wrote us on how to get a blog ID? Thanks

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    1. Hi,HOW TO GET A BLOG ID

      1) Go to Blogger.com and sign up first..Then after signing in,visit the Blog and locate the "comment Box" on any post of your choice(You would see your email signed in from the Drop-down menu)..

      Now click on that letter "B" by your left which is where your photo is supposed to be displayed..

      2) A page would be shown,then click on "EDIT PROFILE" at the top,by your right..

      3) Scroll down and locate "PROFILE PHOTO" then click on "CHOOSE FILE" and select any picture of your choice..
      Be patient and allow it load properly(a spinning circle) then scroll down and click on "SAVE"..

      4) To edit your BLOG ID,scroll down and click on "PROFILE NAME" then edit it to any pseudonym of your choice..

      Hope this helps..

      @MARTINS

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  7. Same with people living with hiv. The stigma is too much. There's a gubernatorial contestant being called out because of his status,I feel its too bad to judge someone based on their status

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  8. Met one at a super market once, he couldn't wheel himself in coz it looked like a slope. I would have passed too, but he asked, so I pushed him in, had to yell at the door man to time a hand, coz he was heavy to push. I pushed him around for his shopping, and outside to his car, which was surprisingly customised, first time I'm seeing such. The brakes and steering were operated by hand. Since I live around, I told him to call me whenever he wants to shop there, dlgave him my number. Once a week he calls, I go and wait for him to arrive, shop and go. He is an IT guy and works from home. Lives in the plushiest places in Abuja with aged parents. We are good friends now, I had to introduce my bf to him, and amazingly they hit it off, he even buys drinks to his house, they'd drink and watch football. Me that did the connect I became a third wheel πŸ˜†πŸ˜†πŸ˜†

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    1. This was heartwarming to read.

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    2. We need more people like you and your BF πŸ‘πŸΎπŸ‘πŸΎπŸ‘πŸΎ

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    3. Awww that was really kind of you❤️

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    4. Awwwww... You are so kind❤️❤️

      πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚@ third wheel

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    5. 15:18, your comment made me smile, even the aged are not left out, no thanks to backward thinking individuals. Thanks for giving that guy a buddy😁😊, na you remain make you go find your bestie.

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    6. Awwwww, this is so refreshing to read

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    7. Awww, that was so kind of you. God bless you.

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    8. You’re so sweet and have a heart of gold reading this was quite heartwarming I smiled through it I wish there are more people like this

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    9. Something I can do 😍 God bless your kind heart

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    10. God bless you.

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    11. My God you are beautiful!

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    12. God bless you for this.You're a good lady..This is heartwarming.

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  9. This really broke me.😭 If him that is privilege could feel this I imagine those who are not how they feel.

    I pray for a better Nigeria that would have even the less privilege in their thoughts and even in government.

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  10. This is heartbreaking πŸ’”πŸ’”
    It is well

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  11. It's few public places that include such facilities for them. We will get there soon. Hang in there.

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  12. Debola, don't mind them, the Nigerian mentality is whacked.
    You guys need to see Debola driving, cool sweet guy.⚘⚘⚘⚘

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  13. Accessibility needs to be a part of every nation's focus. About 30% of ppl who are disabled were not born disabled. Disability can happen to anyone at any stage of life and it should not become an issue only when it directly affects us.

    I have seen so many ppl becoming amputees because of diabetes, others have gone blind. Governments who do not make accessibility a priority will end up paying a hefty price in the long run.

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    1. We need an overhaul in nigeria but Nigerians aren’t even ready for the change they desire this is the truth .

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  14. It's so nice to see him lending his voice for people like him.
    He's cute btw.

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  15. You can now imagine what the less privileged differently able body ones0 will be passing thr

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  16. Stay strong Debola
    That's the reality in Nigeria but if politicians like your dad had prioritise this in ogun state and other states, sure it would have been easier even for the less privileged.

    Love and light

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  17. Why didn't his dad put those things in place in Ogun State when he was the governor and set a good example for others to follow?

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    1. Beats me too, effing selfish politicians!

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  18. πŸ€—πŸ€—πŸ€—

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  19. Eyaaaa... We really have a long way to go in Nigeria

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  20. I pray for a better government in Nigeria where people with disabilities would be included in national planning, infrastructure and otherwise to make life easier for them.

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  21. There is a policy here in Nigeria for accessibility in all public buildings, especially government buildings. But govt
    wey do law no get accessibile buildings or other assistive services, as always na only policy we sabi do, implementation na wahala.

    Also stella, "physically challenged", I know you mean well, but it is not an appropriate term to use. The man himself used disabled, you can use that or Persons/People with disabilities. Please take note of this as you are a media person.

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  22. Everything he wrote is πŸ’― correct. There is no inclusion of the disabled in anything we do in Nigeria.

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  23. All I'm hearing is someone who is whining from a position of obvious privilege while he takes time to remind the reader on and on about his position of privilege

    With your 'I'm a rich, powerful Nigerian ', what have you done with it oh powerful Nigerian?Who do you expect to make the changes? Is it people that have no idea what it means to be disabled?
    Or is it the disabled men and women who do not have drivers or even a bicycle, cannot afford meals at Fahrenheit or VIP section at a concert in London and are struggling to feed because they do not have their father's name to open doors for them that you want to spur a change?

    With all the money and power, 'rich powerful Nigerian that you say you are', what are you doing to better the lot of others and create a mental shift in the thinking.

    Are you galvanising a bill to ensure wheelchair access in ALL public and private institutions?

    Are you sponsoring local chapters to provide though leadership on disabled matters?

    What are you gan gan doing?

    Oh I forgot, no time, one rant down, off to the Youkay to watch Burna boy in concert.

    Issokay.

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    1. For real!
      He’s in the corridors of power (if not in the very bedroom of power). He can start an NGO that pushes for the implementation of policies that make infrastructure for the disabled available.
      I’m sorry but reading this, I was thinking “cry me a river, what have you done to make this even a bit better for people who are less privileged than you since you have a tiny glimpse of what they face”.

      Nigerians have to be the most selfish people on earth. How can his parents, knowing they have a son with disability, not push for infrastructural changes to accommodate people like their son. All they care about is amassing money that will not make life better for their kids in their own country, they have to travel to the UK or US to enjoy that money.
      Look at Enweremadu, he must have thought that as long as he had money, his daughter’s transplant would go well in the UK… look where he is now. The story would have been different if Nigeria had enough trustworthy facilities for a transplant and they did it here instead. The governor of Enugu who is from my spouse’s LGA, all he’s doing during his tenure is buying up all the land around his house and building big mansion. The road directly in front of his house is in shambles. Every time I pass in front of that place I shake my head, how can your village people not even enjoy good road when you are governor? All they care about is ME, ME, MYSELF and ME.

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    2. That's what u got from this write up? Omo people are bitter! Your insecurities are shouting from a very high rooftop. Please help yourself. He is rich and it is a statement of fact! The question is, what makes that fact so uncomfortable for you? Lemme guess. You are one of those who idolize money and place it on a pedestal. That's why it is "normal" for someone to say he's broke. But when he says I am rich, na problem for you when u know it's pure facts. Lol. Sorry o

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    3. 22:23 that was the only thing your brain could absorb from that comment, the word 'rich'? Buahahahahahaha 🀣🀣🀣🀣🀣🀣🀣🀣🀣🀣🀣🀣🀣🀣🀣🀣

      No be me do una o.🀣🀣🀣🀣

      17:15 πŸ‘πŸΌ πŸ’― Thank you.

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  24. I went to a certain bank a while ago (I can't remember the name) and just as we were queueing outside (during the covid), I realized that the bank had just steps and no slope. I briefly wondered how people on wheelchair would get in. And then I remembered our universities, secondary schools etc and I felt so sorry for disabled people in Nigeria.
    The reason all of these crossed my mind as at that time was because I saw a video about a blind girl living in the UK. Their level of inclusion in the UK is mind-blowing. Like, even public places had inscriptions in Braille

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    1. I don't know if this has changed but back then if I remember we had blind students in FGGC colleges and they learned in Braille. We had schools for the blind. Just that we sabi go backwards in this country eh. Infact our past was better which is so sad to say

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    2. It really is mind blowing oh. I still discussed this with my husband last month.
      I sat very close to the seat reserved for the disabled a while back and when it was time for a fellow passenger who was on a wheelchair to disembark, I was so fascinated and impressed with the way the driver lowered the bus and did some adjustments just to make it easy for the man in a wheelchair to go out on his own. Gosh, such inclusion in a society!!! These little things make so much huge difference between developed and underdeveloped countries.
      I hope Nigeria gets to that place very very soon, I can only hope.

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    3. @Dainty, wait till you see how a transit guard wait on a blind person with their guard dog, leading them out from the skytrain to their required buses! Those kind, professional acts are what makes the western world different from Africa! Thank you for saying this here!

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  25. So sad. We are far far behind in this country. He's so cute.

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    1. Like way too cute. Not sure I read the whole write up cos his looks is distracting ha!

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  26. After seeing his extravagant pictures including the one at his opulent home in England, I wonder what he wants the regular able & disabled impoverished youths who his dad and dad’s colleagues looted from to think or say. It’s interesting that the looters & their families point one finger each, forgetting the four fingers pointing back at them. His parents weren’t from rich homes, not the quantum of money they all flaunt. The money they flaunt is from the government they blame for not doing stuff. Yes, there is the Americans with disabilities act (ADA) that sets aside parking spots, specifies building codes etc that are ADA compliant but your dad was in government and did nothing. ADA was passed by Congress & adopted, enriched by different states of the union. Which one did your father and his team come up with? Face them and demand answers from them first. His friends are all in government, you guys all meet at “Owanbes” but SM is where you want recognition? To all the handicapped folks in Naija, I say πŸ‘πŸΎ but to this guy I say shut up, make restitution as you have no legit source of income that matches your flamboyant lifestyle like all those in your circle. Tell them to stop looting and start governing.

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    1. Well, thanks for this perspective and laying it on thick. Hypocrisy should never go unchallenged.

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    2. Don’t mind him. All this cry should be cried in his father’s and mother’s ears. They have the power to make things happen. I don’t know what he expects the ordinary Nigerian to do with this? He has the ears of people in power, he should make use of that and allow us to suffer the suffer that we are managing Abeg.

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  27. You're very human and handsome too. Be strong cute one 😘

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  28. I sympathize with you and all others alike. But this was the kind of thing your father would have pushed for when he was in power and even made inclusions for Ogun differently- abled people. If we talk am as e be now our key go loss yet na shadow them go dey chase.

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  29. This is a struggle, the message is so touching ❤️

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  30. I am always afraid of the future too, I have a three year old son that the doctors said would not walk. I don't know how we will survive in Nigeria but I trust God to help us.

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    1. If you can find your way to any developed country, please do. Nigeria stunts the development and potential of people with disabilities (even that of people without disabilities), it takes a lot of grit to achieve full potential in Nigeria. In other places, people with disabilities live a full normal life (as close to normal as it can be)

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  31. Thank God I am not disabled. It will have been hellish. Debola Why not speak to your father. You are close to people at the helm of affairs. You can force the people in govt to make life easier for people living with disabilities.

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