Stella Dimoko Korkus.com: Nigeria Custom Reportedly Plans To Ban Second Hand Clothes

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Saturday, June 10, 2023

Nigeria Custom Reportedly Plans To Ban Second Hand Clothes

Nigerian Customs Service has announced its intention to place a ban on the sale of second-hand clothes popularly called Okrika in Nigeria.


During a recent interview, a Customs Service spokesperson said that the sale of Okrika clothing is injurious to the country.
He said: “Okrika clothes are injurious to the health of the nation. That is why government deems it fit that it should be banned.

“One should be curious. Nobody knows how and who used these clothing. And most importantly smugglers desirous to turn Nigeria into a dumping ground. We should not accept it.

“We are a country well blessed with human and natural resources. Why will someone go and bring used products?”
The development has stirred reactions from netizens.

From The Nation newspaper.

28 comments:

  1. Make Dem no try am o.
    Okirika is cheap and of good quality.
    I and my kids wear quality okirika. I wear okirika clothes head to toe, shoes, handbags, I even have okirika jewelries, very durable. I have okirika bras and panties too. Been using them since my University days, nothing do me.

    Why am I even bothering my pretty head, they have been singing this song since I was born and they have still not been able to ban it.
    Yimu at all of them.

    ReplyDelete
  2. If this is done,some of us would be out of business. Abeg you people should find something better to do o jare

    ReplyDelete
  3. In a well planned and managed society there is no need for imported okrika because the quality of life is good. Is it the ppl’s fault that okrika is the only way that they can get new clothes? In a country where graduates routinely cannot secure employment easily, civil servants are grossly underpaid and regularly not paid in some states, and pensioners don’t receive their funds regularly and steadily, how will they purchase new clothes?

    ReplyDelete
  4. Foreign rice and tokumbo cars are banned yet we have them everywhere. I personally support this to.encourage my Aba brothers.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You see why we shouldn't judge any leader? We are all selfish, one way or the other. At this point, you don't care about those poor kids, but your Aba brothers.

      Delete
  5. So that average man no go see cloth buy/wear...

    Hmmm

    ReplyDelete
  6. So, how will a common man do. These clothes are what some parents can afford. What's wrong with these people.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Lol..

    Na una go talk where Una want make our Queens go dey get original beautiful designers wear in cheap prices.. as dem dey look peng in those Gucci and D&G bags shey Una no like am..

    Even for abroad sef, Thrift shop dey.. the reasons he's giving is so watery.. it lacks substance

    ReplyDelete
  8. This is a joke right? Even oyibo get thrift shops. These people are working very hard to keep citizens jobless and hungry..mtchewww

    ReplyDelete
  9. Replies
    1. Butuo owedi. This one na egbe onu

      Delete
    2. Castle nsk babe?

      Delete
  10. I don't like it but they should not try it abeg

    ReplyDelete
  11. Here in Sweden i shock when I see white people rushing Okrika clothes like no man business. Take it from me Oyibo like Okrika pass us. Nkiru Sweden.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nkiru how have you been?

      Delete
  12. They had better look for something else to do. This one no follow.

    ReplyDelete
  13. For me, I will never wear or use 2nd hand items. Buy what you can afford! Is even the spiritual implications for me! I bought my micheal kors and coach bags, from their stores in San Francisco then! I carry it now, because of the influx of ok, you will assume.
    High end stuff last longer for me.
    I was not trained to wear used clothes!
    I will rather wear brand new aba made ,than patronise used clothes or thrift shops. I had a friend in London then,who dey always do that rubbish!My spirit man rejects it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's on you. This is some people's source of livelihood and it's only okrika some can afford as well. I buy them whenever I see the ones I like well well. And mind you, you don't even it to call it 'rubbish' again. Buy your own Aba made, make others wey no care about 'spiritual implications' buy their own okrika in peace. Kosi ija ni church

      Delete
    2. πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚ who be dis abeg. People still talk like this? Sounding like when we were in pry sch then and boasting about who rich pass meanwhile na garri some of us drink as breakfast. MK from San Francisco, American Londoner yenyen talk

      Delete
  14. They should talk another thing jare. Na today?

    ReplyDelete
  15. Who beg Una, are we complaining? They will not go looked for smuggled arms and goods, na okrika wey we de manage.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Poor people don over suffer for this country, okrika that has been helpful to those that can't afford designers. Abi Dangooea want to go into textile too?

    ReplyDelete

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